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Submitted by visitors to this website

Posted by John Paul Ramirez

August 22nd 2014

Hi Mr.Nicholson, I've read your Wind on Fire trilogy and Noble Warriors trilogy. Loved both. There was one question I had about writing. How do you come up with the lore of the world? I find it very hard since I have so much ideas that would contradict each others. I already have the story ideas written down but without a right background to support why decisions were made then it could really flaw the story. Thanks in advance for answering my questions and I look forward to reading more of your books.

William Nicholson responded:

You're right, the creation of the rules of the imagined world is crucial. They have to add up, and the plot has to abide by them. I can only say this is the part that takes times to work out. You start with a few basic ideas, and as you devise your plot you learn what more you need to add to keep it making sense. Don't be afraid to start writing - often only as your story unfolds do the ideas come - and then go back and rewrite in the light of your later decisions.

Posted by Jack

August 22nd 2014

Hey, I love the Wind on Fire trilogy and am rereading it again lately. After finishing the first book and starting on the second, I had a thought. Do the singer people have an underlying influence in the first book at all? In the prologue of slaves of the mastery it states that the singer people could summon storms, or so the sailors thought. Did they summon the unseasonal storm at the end of the wind singer in anyway to help out the trio? Thanks :) Jack

William Nicholson responded:

I don't think it was the Singer people behind the storm at the end of the Wind Singer, but yes, their influence underlies everything that happens in the whole trilogy. In a way the books tell the story of the working out of their history, which goes in ever-repeated cycles, from calm, to action, to crisis, and so back to calm.

Posted by Yulia Weber

August 19th 2014

Dear Mr. Nicholson, Iam contacting you regarding a true personal story that is so unusual that I am getting tired of hearing people telling me that I have to write a book about it. I will be really short. This is a summary of it: I was married to a Russian oil/gas tycoon/Russian mobster ( did not know that at the time of the marriage though) at the age 19th. With all of that came all of the good, bad and ugly of Russian money, mafia, etc.. When i tried to leave him ( while i was already in Canada)- he abducted two of my children. It took me four years and a dozen of trips to Russia to find them and bring them back to Russia. Even though, he was officially ( still is) wanted by Interpol and RCMP for abduction, nothing Canadian government could do and i had to find and kidnap them back. During those four years, i was thrown into Russian prison by my ex-husband twice, as well as placed into a Russian mental hospital for a week to keep me quite. While in Russian jail, i was beaten by his bodyguard to “teach me a lesson” and ended up with raptured spleen, fractured ribs and dislocated shoulders – the bodyguard though ended up with ripped out windpipe and lost a part of his cheek from me biting it off. I had to kidnap my children separately as he separated them and they lived in different cities. After i kidnapped my daughter , i spent three months in hiding before i was able to leave Russia. While i hiding, we were chased by Russian police, mafia and special services and had very close calls twice. I had to cross the border from Russia to Kazakhstan on false passport and then we flew to Turkey and then to Canada. Then six months later i returned to Russia ( also through Kazakhstan border to be undetected) to kidnap my son. So, this is a short summary but there is so much more to it such as : Corrupted judges in Russia; paying money on three different occasions to gangsters on three different occasions to help me with kidnappings only to see them running away with my money, time in mental hospital, time in Russian prison and a prison guard helping me; me being on anti-depressants and having two suicide attempts but changing my mind in a last minute as i knew that my kids would stay no chance without me; terrorist attack in Moscow; people who i did not know who helped; ..... I would like your opinion on either I should go through trouble of writing this story or not and what are the chances of it being published and successful. A bit about myself: grew up in Russia, have an aerospace engineering degree as well as a law degree. I have been a champion of Russia in cross country skiing as well as done biathlon , have done fashion modeling, currently residing in Toronto, Canada, have patents and have been filmed for Dragon's Den ( Canadian version of Sharks Tank) as well as currently doing Mixed Martial Arts as a hobby. Thank you Yulia Weber

William Nicholson responded:

You clearly have an extraordinary story to tell. As to whether you could get it published, that all depends on how well you tell it. It's harder than people think to tell a story. Too often the telling becomes a series of incidents - 'and then, and then, and then' - which for all the drama of each incident becomes tedious. The only way to avoid this is to create engagement for the reader with the central character. Can you do that? Maybe the only way to find out is to try a little bit of it, a few pages, and see how people respond. You don't need to go to experts for this; after all, most readers are not experts. Try the pages on friends and family. If they like it, write more. When you have enough - say 50 pages, plus a summary of the rest - send it to an agent. All this is hard work, and can lead to disappointment, so don't even start unless you feel a strong compulsion to tell your story. Hope this helps.

Posted by Mo Levsky

August 18th 2014

One or two letters to newspapers apart, I have never attempted to write. Circumstances dictate that I am now persuaded otherwise, with the result that, off the top of my head, I have completed two or three of what could be seven hundred pages. Autobiographical, I know it has the potential to be anything, but am unsure as to what my next move is, although I have no wish to bandy it, or the idea, around. I read an article featuring you in the Observer, which is how I came to this site. Please advise, regards..

William Nicholson responded:

Your next move is to get some reaction to what you've written, despite your fears. Try it on a friend who you think may be the sort of reader you have in mind. You'll find simply having someone other than yourself read it changes your own perception of your work. Then you have to decide what it is you're writing, and, I'm afraid, you have to finish it. Then you test it again on others. Then you rewrite it to make it better. Then you begin the slog of selling it, to agents or publishers. Don't worry about having your idea stolen. How you write is as important as what you write, and no one else will write like you. Your work will remain your own however many people see it.

Posted by Emily

August 18th 2014

Hi. I've just read "Motherland" and was wondering if it's a coincidence that Geraldine's past problem with a man is echoed in Nell's admirer Peter's wife's situation. Are we to assume that Geraldine has actually been married before (to him)? I assume not, but wanted to ask the question, as I very much appreciate the depth of your novels, coming in part from the occurrence of various mental/physical health issues, often years before they have official names. It is clearly something of which you are very aware. I found this even more so in "Reckless", although it did not answer my question about Geraldine!

William Nicholson responded:

No, I don't mean you to think that Geraldine was married to Peter before. I see your reason for wondering about this - perhaps I've overdone it by having two women who have a reluctance to have sex, though I suspect this is more widespread than we think. In my master plan Geraldine has only been married once. Though I'm still writing, so there's still time...

Posted by SOULA TSIATSIOU

August 17th 2014

Dear Mr Nicholson, I am writing to congratulate you on your superb work, the other reason for my piece of writing is that I am a children's writer from Greece.Recently ,I have written a teen and adults novel,and I am sure it will be amazing to be filmed with so many images and action. You may think I am an arrogant but I ;ll say that I am a forty year old 'kid ' who refuses to stop beleiving in miracles so ....are you interested to see my story? Anyway,thank you for reading my note! Tsiatsiou Soula

William Nicholson responded:

You must continue to believe in miracles, but I'm afraid I'm the wrong person to approach if you want your book turned into a film. You need to go to film producers, or directors. I do write films myself, but only when hired to do so by a producer.