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Submitted by visitors to this website

Posted by Duana Menefee

November 23rd 2013

Hello Mr. Nicholson, My name is Duana; I am a graduate student at Regent University in Virginia Beach, Virginia. In January we are going to be producing "Shadowlands" and I have been tasked with the honour of portraying Joy for my thesis. As the playwright, what insight can you give me as I begin to prepare for rehearsals? What are some of the challenges you see for the actor who plays Joy? In your opinion, what is the most vital thing for me to remember as I explore and build this character? Any pointers, wisdom, or discernment you could give me would be greatly appreciated. Thank you so much! Duana Menefee

William Nicholson responded:

I don't really like to dictate how an actor should play any role I write, because I find so often actors bring their own riches to the work. Obviously in the case of Joy the challenge is to present her upfront character as not too brash - brash enough to shock the stuffy Brits but filled with a high-spirited and highly attractive vitality. I would suggest don't be in a hurry to come in with your next line after Jack has made some of his odder remarks - show by the slight pause that you're listening, you're processing what he says, before you come out with something that throws him off-guard in his turn. Particularly in Act One, it's about two people finding each other, quite slowly. The other thing to say is to do with the cancer and the suffering. My preference is for as little as possible in the line of groaning. Underplay the pain. It's there in the situation. Don't ask the audience for pity. But hey, do it your way, believe what you're saying, and it'll be great.

Posted by Paul Sheppard

November 23rd 2013

Had to write this after just reading your Guardian article. I hope none these oh-so-clever critics succeed in ridiculing your writing! Bad Sex Award has its own roots in shame, and shying from talking seriously about sex. Hence the practice as you point out of presenting sex as "jokey". You are the courageous one for admitting your professional hurt at this "playground" nomination. Presenting yourself with your response, knowing you'll be a target for those who, of course, thoroughly understand the sexual impulse (I don't think) is to your credit. "Mockery is a powerful weapon". Leave "shame" and "anger" to those with small dicks (sorry). Good luck William.

William Nicholson responded:

Thanks. Much appreciated.

Posted by Ralf Lourenco

November 20th 2013

As a network of refugees, migrants in Germany we are looking for the film "The March" in english languages. Is there any possibility to get the film? and is there also a version in french language? It is a great film for a common discussion between the local population and the refugees. We would really appreciate if you can help to get it. best regards ralf lourenco caravan for the rights of refugees and migrants.

William Nicholson responded:

Though I wrote the film 'The March' I have no control over rights to it. It was made by the BBC in cooperation with a number of European broadcasters and it seems to be impossible to get copies of it, because there are so many rights holders. I think it would take pressure from some high political level to persuade the BBC to put in the effort to overcome the obstacles. You're not the first to ask me about this. It saddens me that the film continues to be unavailable.

Posted by Elina Fatemeh Giebel-Inanloo

November 15th 2013

Dear Mr Nicholson, I have asked one question on this site before, about the purity and innocence I associate with Mumpo. My question now is of a very different matter. Judging by the power of your writing and by the answers you have posted, I feel that you have a lot of knowledge and wisdom not only about life, but about the philosophy of life, and of people, that fundamental goodness of people which you so often refer to. I believe that everyone can feel this intense goodness and love, and the great power and positive energy within themselves. This philosophy and warmth, as I call it, has always fascinated me, not least because I know that it is a feeling both myself and my husband have felt. I would like to have the opportunity to talk more with you on this matter. I think it is unfortunate that more people aren’t talking about this power, this love or goodness; I think it is a pity that people aren’t shouting it from rooftops and celebrating it with every breath they take, and trying to fight the “more” that is within us all, for I strongly believe that only by fighting this “More” can we truly become ourselves, and begin the necessity of letting go, of giving, living. Thanks again for allowing me to ask questions on this site, Many warm wishes, Elina Giebel-Inanloo

William Nicholson responded:

I'm not quite sure what you mean by the 'more' that is within us that we must fight - always wanting more, I guess - but as you'd expect I agree on the central value of love/warmth/goodness. You and I don't need to talk: we both need to talk to others, who are not so convinced. I do that through my writing, as best as I can. I'm sure you and your husband have your own way of sharing your values with others. People are often shy of talking about their core beliefs because it's so easy to come across as either nutty or proselytising, and no one wants to be harangued by a religious loon. So in the end our most powerful tool for communicating our values is the way we live. My guess is this is exactly what you do.

Posted by Jeff

November 13th 2013

(Sorry, not a Q.) About Motherland. Good job. Really.

William Nicholson responded:

Thanks.

Posted by John Paul McNeil

November 13th 2013

"Gladiator" is in my top 5, maybe top 2 (usurped only by "Little Big Man"). But this is about "They Fought Alone". My father was in the battles to recapture the Philippines at end of WWII. He always spoke highly of the Filipino guerrillas, leading me to find out about Fertig. As I read more of his fascinating story, I thought, "what a movie this would make". More research, and thus here. I read that it was on hold, too many WWII movies at the time. But now, with the typhoon and all, perhaps rekindled interest for the movie? I truly hope so. My best to you, sir. So fine of you to answer our questions here.

William Nicholson responded:

It is a great story, but as far as I know there's no plan at present to proceed with the Wendell Fertig project.