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Submitted by visitors to this website

Posted by Elina Inanloo

February 7th 2013

DearMr Nicholson, firstly, thank you for allowing readers such as myself to ask questions; being open to questions is a very positive quality. I've read all three books in the wind on fire trilogy, and if I could, I'd ask a thousand questions about every part, every chosen word, every sentence. But I won't. Each part of the novels are in tune with me at different moments in my life, and I feel each concept equally strongly but at different points, so I'm going to be impulsive and ask what my mind is thinking right now. Mumpo's character, is so good and pure, so full of love and simplicity, that I keep wondering what enspired you to invent him. His character fills me with admiration, with a feeling of unworthiness, a feeling of compassion and growth, and with a red hot anger at anyone who put him down. Why did you create a character so good and pure?

William Nicholson responded:

I love your question, even if I don't know how to answer it. When I first started with Mumpo I saw him only as the 'horrible friend', hence his not very attractive name. But as I wrote more I grew to love him more. I suppose there must be some part of me that identifies with him. Certainly I do believe in the fundamental goodness of people. Maybe Mumpo represents that.

Posted by Mike Frinton

February 4th 2013

Hello William , and thanks for setting up this great website.I still talk about , and remember fondly, your revealing documentary for EVERYMAN..."Abide with me" , from 1978....I was just 24 then , and watching it moved me to fall in love with this hymn....Is there any way of being able to buy a copy of the documentary to share with, my now grown-up family ? , thanks ,Mike Frinton.

William Nicholson responded:

Alas, there's no way to get a copy. The BBC has yet to realise that they're sitting on a goldmine of old programmes, which could be made available for sale. I don't even know if it still exists. But what great days they were, when I was able to run free and make what amounts to film poetry. Happy days.

Posted by Anthony Josephson

February 1st 2013

Hi there. I am part of an amateur dramatics company in south Manchester. We have just started rehearsals for 'The Retreat from Moscow' which will run from 16-23 March. What an amazingly written piece of theatre it is! We are very proud to be performing it.

William Nicholson responded:

It's also a tough one for the actors. I wish you the very best. It's a play that's close to my heart.

Posted by Colin

January 29th 2013

Dear Mr. Nicholson, I want to thank you for the fantastic movie 'Les Miserables'! Really great movie. Best regards, Colin

William Nicholson responded:

I agree that it's fantastic - very little to do with me, and very much to do with Claude-Michel Schonberg and Alain Boublil, and the brilliant director Tom Hooper. I'm proud to have been part of it.

Posted by Colin

January 29th 2013

Dear Mr. Nicholson, I have a question I’d like to ask you. At my school we have film classes. As an assignment, we have to choose a screenwriter of movies we like, and try to get an interview with him/her for class. My question is, if it is possible to send you a small interview, so I can use that for class. I’d really appreciate it. Of course, I understand if you’re too busy. Could you please let me know if you would like to do the small interview? Thanks in advance, Best regards, Colin

William Nicholson responded:

Sure. Send me your questions through this site and I'll answer them.

Posted by Daniel Tomé

January 29th 2013

Dear Mr. Nicholson, Greetings from Portugal! Let me start by saying that I have only ever read one of your books, "The Wind Singer", and that was a long time ago. At the time, I didn't pay much attention to literary quality (or even about authors' names!) and therefore I’m afraid that I cannot give you any constructive opinion at this point. In fact, only very recently did I discover that you helped with the script for the "Gladiator" film (which I very much like), and then, to my surprise, I also learnt that it was you who had written "The Wind Singer"(!), hence me coming here to this website. I just write to share some of the memories that I have of that book from my childhood. I was about 10 when I first read it (the Portuguese version, "O Cantor do Vento"), at the suggestion of my older brother. In a word, I absolutely loved it. Unfortunately, I don't have it here with me anymore, so I may be forgetting important parts of the story, but I think that, at the time, I already understood that there was something deeper to it than just the main adventure, and that it was an attack on social inequality and unfairness; and, of course, I could sympathize with the kids who did not like to have to go to school or have tests; and, if I remember correctly, even the adults had to do an exam every year , right?, to see if they could improve or even maintain their "status"?... How horrible! Before finishing the book, I remember telling my mother that I would not answer the questions of the then coming test at school, but rather write about what interested me (maybe cookies and tea? (: ); she did not find it funny, and I didn't go through with that plan... But what I most vividly recall from that time is playing Lego with my (twin) brother, for countless afternoons, pretending to be at Aramanth; I would explain to him that the streets were ordered by ranks (colors) and then I would always play the bad guy dressed in white... Well, good memories. I also have some fond recollections of the book itself. I read it at least one more time, when I was 13 or 14, so I still have present, in my mind, some exciting scenes such as the one where Kestrel visits the emperor who only eats chocolate, or the spaceships, the army of beautiful children marching, and even of wanting to eat those nuts that grow in the mud (they did sound yummy!). Sorry for not expressing myself better, but I am under time pressure (somewhat ironically, I have college exams to study for…), and I would like to send you this today, but I don’t have time to review it. In any case, I want to say MANY MANY THANKS to you, for writing such a wonderful book, and for enriching the lives of so many children, including myself! Kind regards, Your fan Daniel P.S. I plan to read at least the other two books of the trilogy (which I've only heard of recently, thanks to the Internet), as soon as I have the time. I hope to write you again some day.

William Nicholson responded:

You warm my heart. I love to think of you all those years ago, far away from me in another country, sharing my imagined world. I think you're the first reader of the Portuguese edition ever to contact me. Thank you.