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Submitted by visitors to this website

Posted by Megan Livesey

October 3rd 2012

Hello, I love your books very much and have read the wind singer trilogy and the noble warriors trilogy several times. Can I ask, will you be writing any books with the same fictional background at some point in your life? I would love to read more of your work and it is easy to say these are my favourite books and you my favourite author. You are an inspirational author with a perfect imagination. I have tried to write a book myself and at 24 I am in no rush, but its clear to say you have been my inspiration for me to put ink to paper. Thank you. Megan.

William Nicholson responded:

I'm not planning any more fantasy novels at present - I've embarked on a major sequence of contemporary realist novels, starting with The Secret Intensity of Everyday Life. I have another book from the past that is part-fantasy that you may like. It's called The Society of Others. But most of all, press on with your own writing. Don't worry if it doesn't come good first time. Writing is one of the few things that we get better at as we grow older, thank God.

Posted by Monica

October 1st 2012

"We read to know we are not alone" It's such a beautiful line. Who said it? Did you invent it? Did C.S Lewis say it? Did C.S. Lewis repeat what the father of a real student had said? Or did you hear someone say it and then inserted it in "Shadowlands" because it made so much sense there?

William Nicholson responded:

The very simple answer is I invented it, as I invented the entire plot-line of the book-stealing student. 'Shadowlands' is based closely on real events, but all the dialogue is of course made up by me. There was no one around with a tape recorder at the time.

Posted by Mollie

October 1st 2012

is it you emailing me or your assistant???

William Nicholson responded:

I answer all posts on my website personally. I haven't got an assistant.

Posted by Kyle

September 28th 2012

Hi there. I'm a recent high school graduate and have been re-discovering my love of reading and writing, and I figured the best place to start would be a series of books I read back in middle school (back when I had a library) called the "Noble Warriors Trilogy." I'm ashamed to admit that I never got the chance to read the third book in the series and I will be quickly rectifying that problem now that I have some more time on my hands and have re-discovered your other brilliant work which is the more realistic "The Secret Intensity of Everyday Life." I know this isn't much of a question, but I just wanted to let you know that I thank you so much for being passionate about writing and continuing to do so for so many years. It has really inspired me and I appreciate your work, good sir. -Kyle

William Nicholson responded:

I love it when readers of my teen books grow older and discover my adult books. You might also try The Society of Others, a strange boo, part real, part fantasy.

Posted by Mollie

September 28th 2012

please can you write some similar books to the wind on fire trilogy? I am reading them at the moment and they are INCREDIBLE! Hope to hear from you soon for Mollie :):):)

William Nicholson responded:

I have written another fantasy trilogy called The Noble Warriors. You could take a look when you're done with the Wind on Fire, see if you like them.

Posted by Ruth Anne Baumgartner

September 25th 2012

I'm the director of the Newtown production of Retreat from Moscow, and we most definitely did keep the last line. The cast and I had a long and very probing discussion about it and found a lot of resonances. We also gave a lot of attention to communicating our understanding of this aspect of the play: that there were no villains or victims, just people trying to be honest to one another and true to themselves. I was delighted to see the comment from one of our audience members. I came to your site in order to tell you about the extraordinary response we've been getting--especially one evening, when during the curtain call someone called out "Thank you!" I've never heard that happen in a theater. The cast and I want to thank you for a compelling journey through a richly poetic, and real, drama.

William Nicholson responded:

Wonderful to hear. You must have done a really good job - it's a tough play to make work, because everything depends on the audience being in sympathy with all three characters. So thank you.