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Submitted by visitors to this website

Posted by Sam

January 24th 2012

In the Noble Warriors Trilogy does Jango actually mean what it says in the book?

William Nicholson responded:

Not sure what you mean, but I suspect the answer is yes.

Posted by Tracy Blythe

January 24th 2012

Dear Mr Nicholson. I read the Times article when it was published and immediately ordered your book. Read it. Loved it. Now waiting for The Golden Hour to arrive. I am a writer and have one book published. I write about relationships, in particular the humourous aspect to that part of our lives. I'd love to ask you what your advice would be on how a writer can break free of the "chicklit" label given that you have successfully written a book about relationships, using some humour, that appeals to women, and yet there is no hint of the negative connotations associated with "chicklit". Thank you so much for your inspiring work.

William Nicholson responded:

I too have suffered from the chicklit label, so I do sympathise. I'm not sure there's anything any of us can do. There seems to be an assumption in the book trade that if you write about relationships, it's for women only. I try to point out that men have relationships too... All either of us can do is keep on slogging, and hope for readers of both sexes in sufficient numbers to enable us to have some clout when it comes to marketing. Up to that point publishers can say, 'Most books of this sort are bought by women, so we market to women.' And there's no answer to that.

Posted by Derek Palmer

January 22nd 2012

Mr. Nicholson, Apologies, it's taken me ten years to write this. You added funds to my VSO posting in Belize, I bought tools for the workshop. I understand that you've funded VSO since, for that I thank you. With hindsight I regret not visiting when I returned to the UK, to describe what a prison in Central America is like and to let your family hear the sounds of the rain forest at night. Best regards, Derek

William Nicholson responded:

No apologies required. It was a pleasure to help a little. I hope your life has been rewarding in the ten years since your return.

Posted by Hannah and Vanessa!

January 22nd 2012

Please make a movie for the series The Wind on Fire Trilogy! The books are incredible! We are your biggest fans!! Please send the movies all to canada!! "The song of the wind singer will set you free then seek the homeland!"

William Nicholson responded:

I'd love it too - but I can't make movies alone. I'm hoping one day someone will come up with a great proposal.

Posted by Deborah

January 19th 2012

No question. Thank you for writing First Knight.So spiritual. I love it and am just this year seeing it over and over. Fabulous!You are genius at writing that. How does it feel to have your thoughts and ideas on the inside of ones soul? Thanks again, and God bless!

William Nicholson responded:

I love that feeling. Thank you for responding so warmly. It's what writers live for, and rarely get.

Posted by Tara

January 18th 2012

Dear William, I am currently two thirds of the way through 'Secret Intensity' which I am enjoying tremendously. I read you bio with interest. I am female, in my forties, having just failed at yet another relationship. I am attractive, intelligent, with a reasonably successful creative career. Yet I seem to be attracted to men who are emotionally distant and now I am afraid to try again. I wonder if there is any hope of me ever finding love and peace. What made you come to your senses in your relationship with your partner and in your opinion how does one find happiness, if happiness even exists?

William Nicholson responded:

Tough question. And a very common one. I'm no expert, of course, though I have thought and lived this one a lot. I can only report that in my own case the relationships that failed, or ended, were many, and they ended because I was not ready for commitment. I know that sounds dumb, or glib, but I think I grew up slowly, and I think many men do. I was scared off by affairs that wanted to go on for ever, because I was scared of responsibility for someone else's happiness. Perhaps there's a clue here. Of course I wasn't responsible for anyone else's happiness, and was deceiving myself. But if you make up your mind that your life is your own to live, that it won't be 'completed' by anyone else, but that along the way you'll have great friendships and maybe love affairs, it takes away some of the pressure on you and on your partners. Men who are emotionally distant are afraid - actually we're all afraid, so no shame in that. Make demands and the fear increases. But what's a relationship without demands? I know, it's all nuts. Even so, I'm pretty sure this is the secret. You get to a point where you don't need a partner, where you're excited by the life you live alone, and at that point, someone shows up who wants to be with you. There's a bigger point here that's worth making: we're all alone, always and for ever. No one ever knows us as we know ourselves. So the rest is a matter of arrangements, habit, discipline, kindness, shared history... which all adds up to love, maybe. Please don't be afraid to try again. We don't live one life, we live many, one after the other. The next life coming along for you may be the one you've been in training for. And men get better as they age.