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Submitted by visitors to this website

Posted by Margaret P Kennedy

January 30th 2012

I have just come into possession of a new copy of your "The Wind on Fire Trilogy". Which of my grandchildren should I give it to. Grandsons 15 and 13, granddaughter 11. Are they too young? If it wasn't so beautifully wrapped I would open it and read it myself. Thank you.

William Nicholson responded:

It all depends on how good they are as readers. I'd say the 11 year old girl, probably. Your 15 year old grandson may be a little old for it.

Posted by Paul Sheppard

January 30th 2012

When is Golden Hour out in paperback please?

William Nicholson responded:

May 10 2012.

Posted by jo

January 24th 2012

From reports, it seems protracted rehearsals for Les Miserables are about to begin. Are the screenwriter and the composing team also actively involved in this phase of film-making? Are there revisions that can happen if rehearsals are indicating that certain things may not work, say, in the portrayal of a character? Les Mis fans are eagerly awaiting the start of filming.

William Nicholson responded:

There may be minor changes, but really from now on it's all about preparing for filming. I think it's going to be stunning, by the way.

Posted by Sam

January 24th 2012

In the Noble Warriors Trilogy does Jango actually mean what it says in the book?

William Nicholson responded:

Not sure what you mean, but I suspect the answer is yes.

Posted by Tracy Blythe

January 24th 2012

Dear Mr Nicholson. I read the Times article when it was published and immediately ordered your book. Read it. Loved it. Now waiting for The Golden Hour to arrive. I am a writer and have one book published. I write about relationships, in particular the humourous aspect to that part of our lives. I'd love to ask you what your advice would be on how a writer can break free of the "chicklit" label given that you have successfully written a book about relationships, using some humour, that appeals to women, and yet there is no hint of the negative connotations associated with "chicklit". Thank you so much for your inspiring work.

William Nicholson responded:

I too have suffered from the chicklit label, so I do sympathise. I'm not sure there's anything any of us can do. There seems to be an assumption in the book trade that if you write about relationships, it's for women only. I try to point out that men have relationships too... All either of us can do is keep on slogging, and hope for readers of both sexes in sufficient numbers to enable us to have some clout when it comes to marketing. Up to that point publishers can say, 'Most books of this sort are bought by women, so we market to women.' And there's no answer to that.

Posted by Derek Palmer

January 22nd 2012

Mr. Nicholson, Apologies, it's taken me ten years to write this. You added funds to my VSO posting in Belize, I bought tools for the workshop. I understand that you've funded VSO since, for that I thank you. With hindsight I regret not visiting when I returned to the UK, to describe what a prison in Central America is like and to let your family hear the sounds of the rain forest at night. Best regards, Derek

William Nicholson responded:

No apologies required. It was a pleasure to help a little. I hope your life has been rewarding in the ten years since your return.