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Posted by Richard Johnson

April 12th 2011

I loved 'The Wind on Fire' trilogy, but I had one question nagging away at the back of my mind while reading it, which was: at what 'level' of evil you considered the Morah to exist at? Specifically, does the Morah represent evil itself (cf Satan), or one incarnation of evil (cf Sauron)? From another point of view, does evil still exist in 'the beautiful land' - is it a return to Eden, with a potential for once more becoming corrupted, or is it a post-apocalyptic paradise in which evil has been finally eradicated? In reading it I had wondered at times whether there was a slight mismatch between the self-sacrifice of the Singer people and the destruction of the Morah - almost as if Tolkien's Valar had died to destroy Sauron - although on p226 you try to get round this with the suggestion that if the Morah rises again, so too will the Singer people, although I'm not sure that this is entirely consistent with other descriptions which suggest an ultimate finality about the Singer people's sacrifice, though I would need to reread it to substantiate that! Perhaps the question is - in the state of the world as envisaged at the end of the book, is there room for either the Morah or the Singer people, or for others like them, to return? Did the Singer people's sacrifice forever change the 'cosmic structure' of their world, as does the death of Christ in Christian theology, or was it only ever intended to destroy a less-than-cosmic evil but otherwise leaving things much as they were? Was this an issue than you were wrestling with as you wrote the book? Anyway, I still loved them! many thanks, Richard

William Nicholson responded:

The Morah is NOT Satan, or evil in any external form. The Morah is the sum of all the capacity for evil in mankind - ie the Morah is us. I tried to make it fairly clear that the cycle of kindness, action and cruelty keeps on going round and round - we create our own evil that has to be cleansed by the sacrificial action of the Singer people. So yes, the Singers must always return again, because the Morah will always return. It's not at all a Christian idea, and though it may be fanciful, or unsatisfying, it is in its way complete. It also has the merit of explaining the way our world lurches from time to time into horrors like wars even though we all want to live in peace.

Posted by Ashwin

April 12th 2011

What happens to the characters of Echo and Filka at the end of the Noble Warriors Trilogy?

William Nicholson responded:

I don't have any more story than I put in the books, so it's all there, as far as I've imagined it. If you feel there's not enough about Echo and Filka, you can take up their story yourself...

Posted by Ruksar Hussain

April 11th 2011

Hi there,it's been long time since i've spoke to you and i need some advice.Im making a story up about vampires and ive done a whole chapter but im stuck i don't know what to do next I've based my story on the famous horror writer Darren Shan. I need some help so far he is the chosen one who needs to defeat an old vampire who wants to extinguish mankind. I've named my main charachter darren who is half vampire thanks to his master Mr Count. That's all ive got so far i need some ideas for what he does next. I have called this story the life sucker because it's about vampires who suck the life out of innocent people.Tell me what you think and write back please.

William Nicholson responded:

Shouldn't you be asking Darren Shand for ideas? He'd be very tickled. Anyway, here's a thought from me: your main character, Darren, is half vampire, so maybe he could pretend to the old vampire that he's on his side, and will be his servant. Then he can watch the old vampire and learn his weaknesses. Then you have to think up a fun weakness, that makes Darren able to lure the old vampire to his destruction before he extinguishes mankind.

Posted by Elissa Siddons

April 9th 2011

Hi there, I'm an aspiring screen writer and I just wanted to say your book "The Wind Singer" is absolutely amazing, I was wondering if you've ever thought of developing it into a film, I mean ho better to make it into a film than you the writer. Thanks, Elissa :)

William Nicholson responded:

For a film I need a film production company able to provide a lot of money. There's none offering at present.

Posted by Abbie

April 9th 2011

I've recently been sucked into your novel 'Rich and Mad'; I am 17 and have recently fallen in love (luckily the affection is mutual unlike poor Rich and Maddy) and the way in which you write about love summarizes my emotions and feelings towards my partner in a way I could never express. I found myself quoting your book to my other half and sent him passages to describe to him my astonishment at how truthful I found your words to be. I suppose this isn't really a question, more of an expression of gratitude as you have, sincerely, helped me understand my affections and given me a perch to view them from. Thank you William :) Many kind regards xx

William Nicholson responded:

You lift up my heart. We writers want so much to feel we're getting a little closer to the truth of how things are, but we never know until we get the kind of response you send me. I don't know if you're looking for something else to read, but I've been engaged in a series of novels recently that include quite a lot about teenage love affairs. The first book in the series, 'The Secret Intensity of Everyday Life', focusses on a past love affair and its repercussions on the life of a middle-aged woman; but the second book, 'All the Hopeful Lovers', has a number of teenage characters who make various kinds of muddles out of their love affairs. That book is in hardback only at present, but will be in paperback by June.

Posted by Yokko

April 8th 2011

My name is Yokko who is a MFA in Acting student at Actors Studio Drama School. I am looking for my Thesis Project and I am very interested in your screenplay, Nell. I am wondering if I can read the screenplay. I already have the original play, "Idioglossia" (I contacted with the playwright) however, there are little differences between play and film. Is there any possibilities to have your screenplay? Where should I contact with? If you can answer my question, I would be very appreciated! Regards, Yokko

William Nicholson responded:

I'm really sorry, but I find I no longer have any copies of the screenplay. It was written a long time ago, of course, and I think I must have lost it from my records. You could try Fox in LA, the studio who made the film.