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Submitted by visitors to this website

Posted by Perdita Formentelli

June 2nd 2011

Dear Sir, I am a French student currently doing a master degree in English medieval literature at La Sorbonne, and I am writing my mémoire about the renewal of symbolism in the youth literature - which most often revives medieval themes and symbolisation - as an answer to the deconstructionism current that one can find in contemporary literature (cf. Philip Roth, Beigbeder...). In my work, I am mainly concentrating on your trilogy "Wind on Fire", as well as on Pullman and J.K.Rowling's works. This year, I am also part of a French teacher exchange program, which explains why I am currently living in Adelaide, South Australia. While living there, I have been confronted to the Aboriginal culture and, quite amazed, I've found many similarities between their spirituality and the one that you gave to the Manth people and their ancestors. Is there any chance that you were somehow influenced in your great work by the Aboriginal way of thinking and culture? Thank you very much for your time and talent, Ms Perdita

William Nicholson responded:

I too am amazed to hear this. No, I know nothing of Aboriginal spiritual culture. I'm well informed about many spiritual traditions, but that one I have missed. I suppose it's possible that some part of it has reached me via another route. After all, nothing is ever made up.

Posted by Ruksar Hussain

June 1st 2011

Hello there, remember when i asked you about some advice about my own made up book and you told me to write to Darren Shan i did. I think its been about a month and a half so i dont know what to do?so i was wondering if you could help me anything will do anything just something to keep me occupied in the holidays because i get so bored i either write or read so please reply thank you.

William Nicholson responded:

Your book was based on a Darren Shan book, wasn't it? It even had 'Darren Shan' as its hero? Famous writers like Darren get a lot of letters, so you mustn't mind if it takes time to answer them. He may not even be able to answer all of them. I suggest you get on with your book anyway. Imagine you are Darren Shan and write what you think he'd write. And if you get stuck, tell your story to a friend and see what they say. It could help get you to the next bit.

Posted by Rebecca

June 1st 2011

Dear Mr. Nicholson, Please can you answer some questions for me? 1. What or who inspired you to write? 2. How long have you been writing for? 3. What was your first novel? 4. How does writing make you feel? 5. Are you writing a book right now? If so, what is it called and what is it about? 6. Do you have a favourite book? Thank you! Sincerely Rebecca P.S. I'm reading The Wind Singer as a class novel right now and I really like it!

William Nicholson responded:

I think probably it was my mother who inspired me to write. She loves books. I've been writing all my life, certainly since I was a teenager. My first novel was inspired by the James Bond books, I wrote it when I was 16. It was no good, of course. Writing makes me feel fantastic, I love it. I am writing a book now, but I haven't fixed on a title yet. And this one I'm writing now is my favourite book. It's going to be my best ever.

Posted by Daniel Angeles

May 30th 2011

Hi William, If we send mail to your agent or publisher, do you receive and read it?

William Nicholson responded:

Yes, it's passed on to me by both.

Posted by Gustavo Cruz

May 30th 2011

This is not really a question, I would only like to tell you that I some years ago I read the wind singer and that I loved the book. I really loved it, I can distinctly remember sitting on a couch in my grandmother's house, I was maybe 12 at the time, and being struck by the image of an infinite army that could fill the gap between two margins with bodies and then carry on it's march. And also the story of the emperor. It struck me so much that today it came to mind during a conversation, and I thought I would google the book I used to love so much. Never got around reading the other books of the trilogy because they weren't translated into Portuguese, which was the only language I knew then... But even so, you gave the 12-year-old-me a very good time, and I would like to thank you for it.

William Nicholson responded:

I'm sorry you never got to the other two books. But yes, I love to think of you back then, reading my work in Portuguese, and the image remaining with you. Now you're grown up you may like some of my other books (in English) - The Society of Others, maybe? It's full of strong visual images.

Posted by sheila hickey

May 28th 2011

I am doing a university assignment about an extract from one of your novels. I have to compare" the mudnut harvest" to a Seamus Heaney poem "death of a naturalist", please could you give me some information on what this is about and why you wrote it in this way. how the poem and extract compare to each other Thank you Sheila.

William Nicholson responded:

I don't quite know what to tell you that isn't already there in the book. I thought of the Mud People as the opposite of the exam-obsessed people of the city above them - very relaxed, a little druggy, kind-hearted, and fond of good earthy food. I wanted also to suggest that every clean and orderly place must have its counterpart, where (in this case) its literal waste has to be accommodated. I don't know if any of that helps.