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Posted by LaurenJane

December 31st 2010

Its me again! Thank you for responding so quickly to my last 'question'. I too just love codes and submitting to the plea of my inner geek I deciphered the Old Manth writing throughout the books, and proudly, I thoroughly enjoyed it! I would love to read more of your books - are there any books which you can particularly recommend? Oh I do wish we do some of your work at GCSE level, then 'O unhappy people' exams would be somewhat less about our future and for that moment about something we can enjoy! :) (sorry for bothering you again) Thank You x

William Nicholson responded:

Have you tried my other fantasy trilogy, The Noble Warriors? The first book is called Seeker. Also you might like The Society of Others, which is full of concealed puzzles (though most people don't realise it). It's a very strange book about a lost young man on a mysterious journey...

Posted by Tamara Green

December 30th 2010

Not sure I really have a question today but I just read "The Secret Intensity of Everyday Life" all in one sitting. I was stunned by how accurately you wrote of the thoughts consuming my own mind of late...you wrote the book I would have wished to write. Simply beautiful. Thinking deeply and writing clearly. So impressed. Tamara

William Nicholson responded:

I'm deep into the third book in the series as I reply, so your post is a great pleasure. All the Hopeful Lovers (paperback coming in June 2011) picks up some of the characters you've read about some eight years later; and my current work, The Golden Hour (publishing in November 2011), finds the characters in July 2010. I hope you get a chance to read these also. I'm trying to do the same thing all the time, which is write truthfully about the tiny ways our lives hurt and delight us, about the web of events that absorb us, all far removed from the great dramas of most fiction, but nonetheless of such power over us.

Posted by LaurenJane

December 30th 2010

Hello :) Firstly I would like to say I absoloutly love 'The Wind on Fire' trilogy. I dont cry alot at books, but I did at yours, you created and crafted such emotion into every word I couldnt help but to. I have read all 3 books at least three times through and often I spend days reading and rereading them completely immersed in the books. I just would like to say you are my favourite author by far and i would love it (although out of your control) if the books were made into a film. Also if possible please write another book in the trilogy (or quadrilogy then) speaking of life in the Homeland/Obagang (sorry if thats a spoiler) but about the characters we have grown up with and learnt to love, not neccisarily about their children. Please do it would not only make my day but my whole year :) I have a question, how did you think of or rather what inspired you to create the symbol of the singer people in 'The WInd on Fire' trilogy? Thank You x

William Nicholson responded:

I don't have any present plans to write another book in the Wind on Fire series, though who knows? Thank you for your enthusiasm. And the singer symbol: I've always loved this kind of thing and spent many hours twiddling pencil shapes, looking for something that would be a purely visual image for my creation - just as I love codes, and so created Old Manth. I don't really know where it all comes from.

Posted by Sean Cooke

December 28th 2010

Ah William, I come seeking advice once more! I aim to write the first draft of a novel and then edit it enough to be somewhat presentable by April. My problem is, I'm at that horrible point where the blank page terrifies me. I have my plot and love it, same for my characters, but my brain still shuts down at the thought of writing all those words. I think it's because my last novel first draft was indeed abismal. The plot was awful, the characters 2D and there was no underlying theme. It seemed to lack everything. By the time I went to edit that novel I was so uninspired that I couldn't stand the sight of it. I think I'm worried the same will happen to this novel, and I need this novel to be good! Do you have any words of inspiration to give me that motivation to get the head down and work? I know I can do it, I just need that little push to get me going and you've helped me many times before! On a side note, I watched Gladiator last week on TV and I still find new things to admire in it with every watch. You should be extremely proud for having a hand in such a masterpiece.

William Nicholson responded:

You face a problem familiar to all writers: how to shut down the critical brain long enough to let the creative brain do some work. You've set yourself a tight deadline - a novel by April! - but actually that's no bad thing. Go at it fast, telling yourself it's a rough and dirty draft and not supposed to be perfect. That way you've got half a chance of getting to the end before you lose faith in it. And once you have a rough draft, you can start working on it slowly and carefully, making it as good as you know how. Each time you suffer a collapse of faith, put it aside for a day or several, work on something else, then come back to it and you should find you have renewed energy. Beyond this there is an element of sheer discipline required. Make yourself write something each day, on this novel or on other works - a journal even - just so your brain and your body knows there's no escape. Writing is what you do, good or bad, every day. Once started each day, the bad becomes not so bad, then bearable, then good.

Posted by Lucas Eaton

December 21st 2010

Are you going to attempt to get a movie deal for your Wind on Fire trilogy? Honestly, those were the most memorable books I have ever read.

William Nicholson responded:

I'd love to see films of my books, but it's not under my control. Maybe it'll happen one day. Thanks for your support.

Posted by Alan Barkley

December 19th 2010

I very much admire your screenwriting, particularly your ability to evoke emotions in characters through both speech and action. I recently wrote an article on Shadowlands, which remains a superb film to watch 16 years on, and just wanted to pass it along - http://www.suite101.com/content/shadowlands-1993--c-s-lewis-falls-in-love-a32264

William Nicholson responded:

I suppose my central aim is to use words to excavate and communicate emotion. So thank you.