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Submitted by visitors to this website

Posted by Levi

September 24th 2010

Hello William. I read your book SEEKER, and i could not put the book down. I hope you get to make the noble warriors into a moive!!! i dont really have a question, but i Hope that someday, i will be watching tv and an ad for seeker ( the movie ) will show and i will jump up and scream and say WE HAVE TO SEE THAT! In my school, it was hard to get a copy of the book :) Do you think you will ever get it made into a movie???

William Nicholson responded:

I did have a go at getting it made as a movie, but that has gone nowhere. So I don't hold out much hope, I'm afraid. Have you tried reading the two books that follow 'Seeker'? They're called 'Jango' and 'Noman'.

Posted by nolan

September 23rd 2010

I am interested in the creative process and inspiration. having read some earlier posts, I am curious what inspired you to ad what you did to the Gladiator script. When you read the original draft, what guided you in the direction you went? The afterlife themes etc, where did that come from? Did you research the period? Were you inspired by anything in the script? I guess I'd just like insight into your process. Thanks

William Nicholson responded:

How to explain the instinct that tells a writer what way to go with a story? It's all to do with my own sense of what moves me. It's not research. It's a response to the character and situation. I'm excited by killers, but I'm moved by lovers. So I wanted the hero to have someone to reach for in love, all through the story. That desire then dictated the structure that I created.

Posted by Geoffrey Ambridge

September 23rd 2010

Having studied the subject thoroughly, I wrote a novel about the first British explorers to reach the east coast of America in 1585 in what is now North Carolina... (Post edited to protect sender's idea). I would like to get this story at least looked at by a Screen Writer or Film Producer and, if you're interested, I would be happy to discuss the storyline with you in greater detail.

William Nicholson responded:

I think it sounds like a great story, but I'm full up with my own ideas, I'm afraid, so it's not something I can help you with. But it's definitely got potential.

Posted by Susan Ferguson

September 23rd 2010

Dear Mr Nicholson I am interested in pursuing a career as a novelist/screenwriter and wondered if it was possible to meet you to chat about my options. I look forward to hearing from you. Kind regards Susan Ferguson

William Nicholson responded:

I'm really sorry, but I'm the wrong sort of person. You need to chat to someone on the business side - agent or producer. I sit and dream up stories, and I guard my time a little jealously, as you can imagine. But best of luck.

Posted by james

September 21st 2010

Great answer, Thank you. Last question on the subject... As I understand it, you added the theme of the "Afterlife" into the script, and decided to kill Maximus' family... both absent in the original script. Was it ever acknowledged that you made the film better in the end? ( For the record, I do) Thank you again for your insight and prompt answers. You are a truly gifted writer.

William Nicholson responded:

Credit is a very sensitive are for all concerned (I've edited your question a little). Yes, the afterlife theme was my invention, but the killing of Maximus's family was in the script before I came on board. As for the rest, I've been well rewarded for my work on Gladiator, and well acknowledged, and I have no complaints.

Posted by James

September 21st 2010

Thank you for your prompt reply. I have read on several occassions that Mr.Crowe disagreed openly with your dialogue and proclaimed "he was the greatest actor in the world, and could make any garbage sound good." What was your reaction to this behaviour, and also, having watched the finished film, did Mr.Crowe ever apologize or state otherwise? I would hope so, since you wrote his most famous lines ever, and perhaps one of the most powerful moments in cinematic history ( The speech after he removes his helmet and reveals himself to Commodus in the arena)

William Nicholson responded:

Nothing is ever as simple as in the anecdotes. Russell Crowe was under huge pressure with an ever-changing script. My re-working of the speech was no more than that, a re-working. I took no offence at his remark, which was probably jokey anyway. When shooting there's a spirit of battle which makes everyone focus on the result not on personal egos, and odd though it may sound, I do believe Russell Crowe's concern was for the end product, not his own glory. The complicating factor for a film star is that these two things are interlinked.