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Submitted by visitors to this website

Posted by Mia Sands

July 17th 2010

Hi, I'm 16 and aspiring to be either a director or an editor. I was wondering if you'd ever thought of making the 'Wind on Fire' trilogy into films, as you have had experience directing before. As I was reading the books, I found that a lot of the descriptions were written in a way that could be useful and inspiring to a director and therefore made into a film. If I ever become famous in my chosen field (haha admitedly unlikely) I'd love to make the films myself. I just wanted to know whether you ever intended for the books to be screenwritten in future? Thanks, Mia.

William Nicholson responded:

They would be expensive films to make, and so far I've not had an offer that convinces me would do a good job. But I'm not against the idea at all. So maybe one day you'll be a famous director and you'll be the one.

Posted by Adriana Marachlian

July 16th 2010

Dear Mr. Nicholson, I just wanted to tell you how much I LOVE your Wind On Fire Trilogy. I know, right? How many times have you heard that? However, I didn't think this would make much sense unless I said that. Your trilogy has been among my all time favorite books ever since I first read it. Before I ask my question, I feel I have to tell you that I had NO idea you wrote in English... I read your trilogy more than six years ago, when I was still in high school and knew not an ounce of English. I read them in Spanish and they were called El Viento En Llamas (EL Silbador del Viento, Los Esclavos del Maestro, and El Son del Viento). Anyway, my two brothers, both seven, have been wanting to read my books so I handed them the first two and told them to haven fun. Then I re-read your name on the cover and realized how un-Spanish it sounded. May I say that I was thoroughly shocked? I was. In any case, I searched the internet and landed on your official website and thought I should tell you this pointless story. Oh, the never-ending circle of life. On to the actual question: what would you say is the hardest step of the writing process? (planning, characterization, editing, etc.) I like to write and I'm always curious about how other writers go about it. Keep writing, it makes the world a better place. Love, Adriana. P.S.: This is rather strange, but I think the name of Firesong sound better in Spanish than in English.

William Nicholson responded:

In six years your English seems to have gone from zero to perfect. Which is great for a writer, as you plan to be, because English, for better or worse, has become the global language. The hardest step for me: maintaining belief in your book through the long business of actually writing it. Just keeping going. And then doing what you know has to be done, which is rewriting. All the best with your own creations.

Posted by Michele Stapleton

July 14th 2010

I happened upon The Trial of True Love during a vacation at a lovely cottage in Quebec,Canada. What an enjoyable way to spend a day and a half. And yes, the ending surprised me mightily! sincerely, Michele Stapleton

William Nicholson responded:

Maybe you'd enjoy my newest novel, The Secret Intensity of Everyday Life. It's contemporary and very real, whereas True Love was a little more fantastical; but everything I write has the same mind behind it. And I am very proud of this new book...

Posted by Iman Abbasi

July 14th 2010

Hi dear Mr. Nicholson. Would you help me giving some tips how to adapt from a novel? Actually my problem is how to figure out a novel is or isn't copyrighted and I can adapt it? Thanks a lot

William Nicholson responded:

The odd thing is I've never adapted a novel for the screen. I write my own novels and my own screenplays, mostly, because I love creating characters and plot. So I haven't even tried to enter the world of copyrights. Sorry.

Posted by Judith Parmet

July 13th 2010

More a comment: we can love more than once albeit in a different way, therefore which kind of love impacts one's life the most?

William Nicholson responded:

Oh boy. Yes, we can love more than once - why not? The more love the better. Love generates love. If you mean love-and-marry, then I guess one at a time is the only way. But all love has massive impact on one's life. I realise that more or less tells you nothing. Sorry. I'm stumped.

Posted by Kim Crissey

July 13th 2010

Dear Mr. Nicholson, My father is big fan and avid reader of your books and I was hoping you could send him an autograph to cheer him up, he just had quadruple bypass heart surgery and I know receiving an autograph from you would put a smile on his face. I have included his name and address below. Thank you very much, Kim Crissey

William Nicholson responded:

I shall do so with pleasure.