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Posted by Penny Moran

August 18th 2010

Dear William Nicholson, I have no questions for you but am in a state of feverish excitement at having "discovered" The Secret Intensity of Everyday Life." I cannot tell you how much I admire your style of writing, your depth of understanding of - well, everyday life, your living breathing characters, the plots, the twists and turns etc etc and the absolute quality of your prose. I am right there with your characters. Thank you, thank you so much for such a fantstic read. My only sorrow is that I will be left in a vacuum when the last page is read but there is always the promised sequel to look forward to. What a super writer you are! Best wishes, Penny Moran

William Nicholson responded:

All I can say is you must be an extraordinarily perceptive reader, and I need more of you. I've put all I've got into this book, and it does my soul good to receive responses like yours. It wasn't easy to get the book published - the general view being that the middle classes don't deserve such sympathy - but I suppose if I have any philosophy at all it's one based on compassion. I'm just so moved by the little struggles of life all round me, and I so want to say to everyone, Don't presume you know what's going on in others, don't be too hasty to judge, they're having a harder time than you know, just as you are. Anyway, my publisher is sticking with me, so there's two more books to come...

Posted by Camille

August 18th 2010

Can you have an online fan club called The Society of Others?!

William Nicholson responded:

I love the idea. I'm not sure who'd join, other than me, and maybe you. But then, I'm not very clued up about online stuff.

Posted by Sally Middleton

August 16th 2010

Dear William. I very much enjoyed meeting you recently at Charleston. I have been wondering if you have managed to read Simon's Story, the book I gave to you written by Sarah Davies? She believes passionately in her book and would be most grateful if there is anything you, or anybody you know, could do to help publicise it? With many thanks, kind regards Sally.

William Nicholson responded:

I haven't had a chance yet, I'm afraid.

Posted by Ron Andrea

August 14th 2010

"We read to know we are not alone" (spoken by two characters in the movie "Shadowlands") is frequently attributed C. S. Lewis. Is that true? Or is that quote your composition?

William Nicholson responded:

The line was written by me, not CSLewis, in common with all the rest of Shadowlands.

Posted by Bex

August 12th 2010

Hi, I was wondering how hard it was for you to find an agent, I have tried many times and I'm on the verge of giving up. Did you ever felt like you never got anywhere? I hope u don't mind me asking these questions.

William Nicholson responded:

I was approached by an agent back at university - those were the days. Yes, it is very hard now. Best to look out for the new young agents. But of course, you have to have something that looks good for them to sell. Get printed somewhere - anywhere - if you can. Then you look real.

Posted by Taylor McAlister

August 12th 2010

I am a massive fan of your work, but I wanted to ask a few questions, if it isn't too much trouble. First off, how is it that you get your inspiration? I'm a big fan of the Wind On Fire series and I read it all the time. It has one of those endings that just leaves you breathless and I can't imagine how you would have come up with it. Second was how did you first get 'discovered'? I mean how did you go about getting published the first time? And did you get your work rejected at all? If so, how did you deal with it? Sorry for all the massive rambling questions, I'm just genuinely curious, I really want to be an author when I complete my VCE studies so I'm just wondering what to expect. Love your work!

William Nicholson responded:

I don't think I was ever discovered. I just kept on writing and getting nowhere until suddenly I got some small breaks. I won a short story competition. I got a radio play accepted. Then I started to get TV work done. And all the time I was getting better. Rejections? All my life. Hard to deal with - impossible, really - but I think after each rejection I sat down and said, So what did I do wrong? The truth is writing takes a lot of practice, and I wasn't good enough in the early days. So take rejection as a demand that you do better - and do better. Don't build your whole world round being successful as a writer. Live your life. It'll all go into the writing in the end.