Your Name:
Your Email Address:
Your Question:
Please enter the code above in the text box below:

Search past questions

Submitted by visitors to this website

Posted by Judith Parmet

July 13th 2010

More a comment: we can love more than once albeit in a different way, therefore which kind of love impacts one's life the most?

William Nicholson responded:

Oh boy. Yes, we can love more than once - why not? The more love the better. Love generates love. If you mean love-and-marry, then I guess one at a time is the only way. But all love has massive impact on one's life. I realise that more or less tells you nothing. Sorry. I'm stumped.

Posted by Kim Crissey

July 13th 2010

Dear Mr. Nicholson, My father is big fan and avid reader of your books and I was hoping you could send him an autograph to cheer him up, he just had quadruple bypass heart surgery and I know receiving an autograph from you would put a smile on his face. I have included his name and address below. Thank you very much, Kim Crissey

William Nicholson responded:

I shall do so with pleasure.

Posted by Evelyne

July 13th 2010

I can't quite put my finger on what draws me to the Wind on Fire trilogy over and over again. Maybe it's the way I seem to discover another layer of it every time I read; but at the same time, each time I read I don't feel like I'm not quite understanding anything. That was slightly convoluted, I realize, but I hope you see what I mean. There are authors who write such pretty sentences I feel I have to read them aloud to others. You aren't one of them; your writing isn't ridiculously pretty, it's just.. real. Maybe that's why I never tire of it. On to the questions- I'm sorry if they've already been asked, but I can't bring myself to look through over 95 pages of Q&As- When did you discover you were a writer? Do you think everything you write is at least a little autobiographical? Which authors most heavily influenced you? Are your characters mostly based on people you know? When you write dialogue, do you imagine each character's to be speaking in a distinct voice, or is it more..words that suit the character's personality?

William Nicholson responded:

I don't think I discovered I was a writer, I just really wanted to be a writer. What I write is definitely autobiographical - I've felt the feelings of my characters - but of course I'm not telepathic and can't fly. The characters similarly are based on people I know and on jumbles of people I half know and on bits of myself. When I write dialogue, I am that character, so I just 'speak'. I'm not conscious of the voice. Maybe I should be more so. The authors I love most - eg Tolstoy, Chekhov - have a style that is clear as glass, and doesn't draw attention to itself. I'm less enthused by writers whose prose style is the star.

Posted by susan

July 13th 2010

I have composed this comment in my mind more than several times. In brief, your words helped my husband and me fall in love. In 1996, our community theatre group did SHADOWLANDS with me as the director and the man who would later become my husband as C.S. Lewis. There were phrases so powerful and delightful that not only would I listen for them specifically each night we rehearsed, but have now become part of our daily life together, I can't help but think that the love story you wrote has contributed significantly to our lives and for this I am ever grateful. Thank you.

William Nicholson responded:

I feel honoured. In a very different way the play did the same thing for me. I now think that writing it exorcised my fears of commitment, because I married (late, though not quite as late as CSLewis) not long after.

Posted by Lucy Brooke

July 13th 2010

Hello there, Not a question but a compliment! I've just finished The Secret Intensity (after reading the Obs. review) and had to tell you I truly enjoyed it. All the characters were believable and even the "baddies" (Aiden and the Dogman) had warmth and humour. Alan Strachen's story was great - especially his sex-life! In fact, all the sex was fab and properly sexy (and this coming from a woman!). Can't wait for the next one; you've got a new fan.

William Nicholson responded:

That's the kind of compliment I really appreciate - particularly about the writing of sex scenes. It's famously difficult, and I really bust myself to get it right, in tone, in truthfulness, without resorting to the easy option of making it all ridiculous. So I value your response. Thank you.

Posted by Val Hewertson

July 11th 2010

After reading the Observer Review a few weeks ago, I've just finished Secret Intensity which I loved and am glad to see the sequel is out in September. I'll also be getting Rich and Mad for my teenagers. Keep them coming please...!

William Nicholson responded:

I'm really pleased you liked my two most recent books. Rich and Mad is a one-off, I think, but the Secret Intensity world is rather taking me over. All the Hopeful Lovers comes out in September (in hardback), and I'm now planning the third one in the sequence. This method means I can keep on going deeper and deeper into my characters' lives.