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Submitted by visitors to this website

Posted by Laura

October 7th 2009

Mr. Nicholson, I'm writing a paper about you for my eigth grade english class. If you wouldn't mind, I would like to know some of the most significant events in your life. I would also like to know how you began your career in writting novels and sceenplays. Thank you.

William Nicholson responded:

Sorry, I don't really know how to begin to answer such huge questions. My bio on this site will tell you quite a lot. The best thing that ever happened to me was my marriage, in 1988. The next best, the birth of my three children. Golly - after that I don't know what to say.

Posted by Annalee Parker

October 6th 2009

Wow! I've just finished reading The Wind Singer, Slaves of the Mastery and Firesong, and I absolutely love these books! I am certainly going to read them over and over, and buy some more of your books! I was wondering how you came up with such amazing things to write about? I was also thinking these books would be really awesome if they were made into movies, I've often had dreams about these becoming real. :)

William Nicholson responded:

You may like my other fantasy trilogy, the Noble Warriors. They'd make good movies too. But no one seems to want to go that way at present.

Posted by John

October 6th 2009

You write in your bio (and in more detail in an essay that you used to have on your website, but that I don’t find now) that you found love by ending your search for someone you loved, and instead looking for someone with whom you could be happy – and that from that point, love naturally unfolded. You also write (in your wonderful stories, as well as your bio) about your continuing search for God. Have you ever considered taking the same approach to God as you did with romance: rather than looking for God or ultimate truth, just looking for a view of life that makes you happy and letting things unfold from there? I know that can be taken as “playing make believe,” but I don’t think it has to be viewed only at that level. In any case, by asking the question I’m not implying that that’s what you ought to do. I’m only asking. Best Wishes, John

William Nicholson responded:

I think what you describe - looking for a view of life that makes me happy and letting things unfold from there - is very much what I do. And of course the story is far from over. Who knows where I'll end up? I think only a very sure believer would assume that the search will end in God. But of course I can't rule that possibility out.

Posted by Norbert Uzseka

October 6th 2009

Dear Mr. Nicholson, I’ve just finished reading The Society of Others, in Hungarian, although the book was published in 2006. I love to find such rare wonderful books. I’m pretty sure I don’t get everything or even at least as many as a native English reader would get, yet, it means so much to me. I wish I’ve had this book in my twenties. Yet, at age 34, I can understand so much more, and I’m not really sure that I could have understood the message that I get now. After all, the book is about things that one can only understand by living them. Not by reading about them. But on the other hand, I’ve always been touched by many different musics, books, movies and so on, that brought me to smaller or bigger revelations, and I’m sure you’ve been, too. How else could you write a book like this? :) I see I’ll have to read this book again, and as I’m working at a rights agency, I’m pretty sorry that we don’t represent your agency in Hungary :) Anyway, I’ve asked your Hungarian publisher whether they’d publish your further novels (if not, then I’ll buy them in original, my English needs to be improved anyway), and I’m definitely going to read Wind on Fire trilogy, too. And will write a review of The Society of Others to my blog (and maybe to the Hungarian Metal Hammer - you may never know, who'll find your book). This is a book that should be read by many over here. To remind us that our state in our ex-Socialist country isn’t that bad at all, and also to help those who try to find their own way or their selves as new-grown-ups, or whoever else. Anyway, all I really wanted to say is a big thank you for this book. And for your movies, too. Thank you, Mr. Vicino for reminding us that we can lead a life that’s worth living it and that real values don’t stop existing because of the world’s twists and turns! :)

William Nicholson responded:

Thank you, too. I love to think of you reading my book in Hungarian. I spent a few weeks in Budapest in 1986, working on a BBC documentary. So maybe the odd fragment of that experience went into my book.

Posted by jacqueline twamley

October 6th 2009

As he enters from the far door, has that got something to do with him shooting the Chief of Security at the begining of the book, thats all I can think of, I have been thinking for days now, I hate it when I dont understand but I am never afraid to ask, it might make you look a bit silly but howelse are you supposed to know

William Nicholson responded:

In that paragraph you'll find the line 'the face I dread to find: my own'. And later, 'I will kill him, this familiar jailer, this guardian self'. The man who has hunted him, the man he kills, is...

Posted by Diego Del Brocco

October 5th 2009

Dear Mr Nicholson, I am a local guy who has just finished writing his first screenplay. What advice should I follow regarding the need of an agent and how to find one? May I also ask...what is the best and safest way to copyright? Thank you so much for your time! Kind regards, Diego

William Nicholson responded:

I've never bothered to copyright any of my screenplays. It's not an issue, really. Suppose someone ripped off your work, would you go to law over it? And really, it doesn't happen. As for agents - you just have to get the Writers and Agents Yearbook and plough through it. If you have no track record at all, best to target the new small agencies that are trying, like you, to make a name.